New Study Reveals America’s Most Common Recurring Dreams

Everyone has weird dreams – whether we’re falling through the air, being chased through the streets, or losing our teeth. And most of us have had the same weird dream more than once. 

But what are the most common recurring dreams we have? How early in life do those dreams start? And how do things like region and gender influence our nighttime illusions? 

Well, the team at Amerisleep surveyed over 2,000 people scattered throughout the U.S. and across a variety of industries to find out. Here’s what the research revealed.  

When we asked our respondents what they dream about over and over again, the most common answer was falling. It turns out that about 54 percent of those surveyed have experienced this heart-pounding dream before. 

Also common were dreams about being chased (51 percent), being back in school (38 percent), and being unprepared for a test or important event (34 percent). 

33 percent had recurring dreams about flying, while 30 percent said mortality.  

Also on the list are spiders, snakes, and other creatures (17 percent), meeting a celebrity (17 percent), and drowning (9 percent).  

When do recurring dreams start? 

The most common answer, by far, was childhood; nearly 39 percent of those surveyed said their dreams started in the early years of their lives. At the same time, 21 percent indicated that their recurring dreams started in adolescence, and 15 percent said theirs started in adulthood.  

Interestingly, 25 percent of our survey takers admitted that they have never had a recurring dream. 

The geography of recurring dreams: 

Turns out that no matter where you live in the U.S., the most prevalent dreams are the same. Falling is the No. 1 dream everywhere except for the Midwest, where it ranks No. 2. Being chased follows closely, with it either tying for first place or ranking a close second across the board. 

The gender of recurring dreams: 

Men and women also reported a marked difference in the types of dreams they have. Women are more likely to dream about being chased or losing teeth. Men, conversely, are more likely to have positive dreams, such as flying or getting rich. 

Certified Sleep Science Coach McKenzie Hyde said: “If you’ve been dreaming for years about falling off a cliff, running from a faceless stranger, or moving in slow motion, you’re definitely not alone. Recurring dreams, especially of the anxiety-inducing sort, are common throughout the U.S. 

“So what can we do to minimize our nightmares and maximize our restful sleep? For one, 93 percent of Americans say a comfortable mattress is important for a good night’s sleep. Reducing your day-to-day stress also helps you sleep better. Room temperature, what you eat, and technology all matter a lot as well.” 

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Methodology: Amerisleep surveyed 2,007 U.S. residents. Respondents were 49.9 percent male and 50.1 percent female and ranged in age from 18 to 74. They came from all 50 states, plus the District of Columbia. 

*Article provided by: https://amerisleep.com/ 

**Article contains affiliate links

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2 Responses to New Study Reveals America’s Most Common Recurring Dreams

  1. Interesting that women are more inclined to have bad dreams than men. I wonder why that is.

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